Erik Laffer

February 26, 2014 § 1 Comment

“Far from holding up a simple mirror of nature that is true or false, maps redescribe the world—like any other document—in terms of relations of power and of cultural practices, preferences, and priorities.”

J.B. Harley, The New Nature of Maps

I was born in Smithtown, New York, in 1982, and was the seventh of eight children. At the age of three, my family moved to a small town in upstate New York, where I lived until I was 14. Then we moved again, to Delmar, a suburb of Albany, New York. I have been moving ever since.

Given my nomadic background, it’s almost natural that I’ve come to express myself—rather look to shape my identity and better understand myself—in maps. While my early landscapes and figurative works were influenced by the rural environment I grew up in, as well as the feelings of isolation I felt as a child with a learning disability, the representational abstracts that make up my current Cartography Series are not so much a study of emotion, as my earliest works were, but more of a logical and experimental exploration of where I’ve been, where I am now, and where I hope to be tomorrow.

My goal with the Cartography paintings is to, as J.B. Harley writes, “redescribe the world,” or at least the small world of Erik Laffer. And just as there is a language of mapmaking, there is style and body of symbols in my paintings that define the landscape of each work and identify my struggle to understand self, family, home, and culture: boats, clocks, buildings, bridges, anatomy, arrows, and, among many others, lines, color, and texture.

There’s a popular expression: “you’ll learn more about a road by traveling it than by consulting all the maps in the world.”  While I recognize the truth in this, I also believe there is great value in history and charting where we have been and where we are going. And this is what my Cartography Series represents. After all, some roads—racism, sexism, classism, poverty, and all other forms of oppression and discrimination—are better to understand than experience.

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Hana Panek

December 4, 2013 § 1 Comment

My work is based on organic and natural themes from the world around us.    Each piece has a concept – a place, idea, mood, or memory.  I try to convey that without accurately reproducing any subjects, and instead rely on colors, lines and abstracted shapes for expression.  Recently I have started to incorporate man-made interventions and am interested in their relationship to our natural environment.  I paint mostly in acrylic, and like to use pieces of my older paintings, collage, and other scraps.  I work spontaneously, do not fully plan paintings out ahead of time, and usually have several pieces going at once.

website: www.HanaPanek.com

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Karen Rosasco

November 2, 2013 § Leave a comment

Bio PhotoA retired high school teacher with 31 years of preparing students to enter some of the top design schools in the nation, Karen has also been teaching adults for over 35 years. Her workshops entitled “Abstraction By Design” feature layered fluid acrylics and collage and she is demand across the US and Canada. Karen formed a company “Art Escapes” in which she has led art and culture trips to all parts of the world including 6 continents. She is a member of many local and national art societies and has won major prizes including the Silver Medal at the 2007 American Watercolor Society International Show. Her work hung on 5th Avenue in NYC for a month before traveling the US for a year and a half.

www.karenrosasco.com
kkrosasco@aol.com
540-941-0010

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